Jeff Tweedy, Marketing Genius

No, I do not own a Volkswagen nor do I intend to buy one – yet. So this post will not discuss the use of Sky Blue Sky as a soundtrack for VW spots, nor be a diatribe against Jeff Tweedy as a sell out (dude, it’s Jeff-freakin-Tweedy in his prime, not Iggy & The Stooges or Led Zep pushing Cadillacs, The Who pushing everything – I’m assuming to pay for Pete Townsend’s legal fees as it pertains to that little kiddy porn incident from a couple years ago, or the vast amounts of relatively indie artists looking to make a buck from their relatively radio unfriendly music – wait, perhaps that’s Tweedy’s angle here). Anyway…

I’m going to reach back about a dozen years to the stellar sophomore effort of Wilco (so good they don’t even have a sophomore slump, though they did have to get the rest of that Tupelo out in the first one before they could become the innovators that they are) that put them on the map – Being There – and specifically the song “Outta Mind (Outta Sight)”. As I dwelt on the lyrics a bit, I took away a conversation that a Brand and a Customer might have in this digital age of two way media…

(Brand to Customer in a patronizing voice): I know, we don’t talk much but you’re such a good talker. I know we should take a walk, but you’re such a fast walker.

(Customer to Brand in an exasperated, frustrated voice): I know where I’ll be tonight, alright. Outta mind, outta sight.

(Brand to Customer, removed from high horse): Well, OK, I know you don’t love me but you still been thinking of me. Well, alright, I know you probably hate me, but that’s OK with me.

(Customer to Brand, becoming dismissive now): Outta mind, outta sight. Outta mind, outta sight. You don’t see me now. You don’t want to anyhow.

(Customer to Brand, threatening): Look out here I come again and I’m bringing my friends. I said look out here I come again and I’m bringing my friends.

(Brand to Customer, defeated and repentant): OK, alright. OK, alright. I know where I’ll be tonight, alright. Outta mind, outta site. I know you don’t love me. I know you don’t love me anymore.

It’s obviously “Wishful Thinking” in this day and age if brands feel they can act like “The Late Greats” and not be left realizing they may be “Too Far Apart” from their customers, and singing a new tune – “Say You Miss Me”.

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Filed under customer relationships, music, random play all

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